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Dutch Entrepreneur Says He Can Clean Up the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch
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This summer, a small armada of vessels from all over the globe will converge in the Pacific Ocean. Their arrival is expected to herald what arguably can be called one of the more creative environmental cleanup projects. As many as fifty boats consisting of everything from research vessels to private cruisers, sailboats and commercial fishing vessels will track the Pacific’s Great Garbage Patch as it makes its rocky journey through currents between Hawaii and the California coastline.

The mega exploration, as the team at the nonprofit organization, The Ocean Cleanup, calls it, will help the organization close in on their efforts to clean up the burgeoning debris in the world’s oceans.

turtle“At least 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic are currently in the oceans, a third of which is concentrated in the infamous Pacific Great Garbage Patch,” the NGO says. Researchers have already checked the open seas in an effort to get a sense of where the garbage is located within the five massive gyres that span the globe.

Researchers have determined that there are now at least 100 species at risk from the garbage, including the loggerhead turtle and the Hawaiian monk seal. Fish and mammals are at risk of becoming entangled in plastic as well as ingesting it, which means oftentimes, it enters our food stream as well.

The concept behind The Ocean Cleanup is the work of 20 year-old Boyan Slat, from the garbage 2Netherlands, who at the age of 16 embarked on a goal to prove that the world’s oceans could be rid of plastic, and quickly…

SOURCE: JUST MEANS

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